Testosterone's Medical Uses Part 2

TESTOSTERONE’S MEDICAL USES

This is the first of 5 reports on men’s health. This report is an outline of the 4 to follow. My original report on 

testosterone was published in the Atencion 3years ago. A lot of new research has been added to the 4 articles to 

follow.

These male health issues are all RELATED

TESTOSTERONE & GENERAL HEALTH

TESTOSTERONE &YOUR HEART

BPH (prostate enlargement)

ED (erectile dysfunction)

SOLUTIONS/ REMEDIES/ SUPPLEMENTS

If you do not want to receive these reports please send me an e mail

Thank You

Ross Macdonald

TESTOSTERONE ET.AL 

TESTOSTERONE IS AN ANDROGENIC SEX HORMONE PRODUCED BY A MAN’S TESTICLES, 

AND TO A LESSER DEGREE, IN SMALLER AMOUNTS, BY THE OVARIES IN WOMEN. WHILE 

TESTOSTERONE IS STEREOTYPICALLY ASSOCIATED WITH VIRILITY, IT ALSO PLAYS A 

ROLE IN MAINTAINING MUSCLE MASS, BONE DENSITY, RED BLOOD CELLS, AND A 

GENERAL SENSE OF WELL-BEING.

Recent research studies from major universities and health organizations show that low or high testosterone levels 

are detrimental to several aspects of men’s health. Testosterone is measured at two levels —bonded and free---the 

latter being the active form. Bonded testosterone makes up about 90% of the total and is bonded to bones and 

muscle. Free testosterone flows in the blood and is very important for many health aspects in men and women.

Metabolic Syndrome is a combination: -waist size, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar. It 

leads to diabetes, heart disease and the inability to process fats and sugars. Men with low testosterone have an 

increasing prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, stress, and body fat (especially visceral belly fat). As total 

testosterone levels rise to the optimum level, (550ng/dl) or above, the chance for these diseases decreases. 

The important consideration is hormone balance. As men grow older they are more and more at risk for increases 

in an enzyme called aromatase. One of the main causes of this increase is belly fat. Obesity can cause estrogen 

levels to rise because belly fat produces aromatase which coverts testosterone into estrogen. 

When testosterone and estrogen are in youthful balance there are many protective effects. Research has shown 

there is an increase in mortality when estrogen levels are either too low or too high.

Measuring FREE testosterone is the most accurate way of assessing levels in men. The balance should be 20-

25ng/dl free with estrogen less than 30ng/dl. An in balance between these two hormones leads to diet resistant belly 

fat which is due to either too much estrogen or too little testosterone. In men this fat increases estrogen resulting in 

memory loss, lack of motivation, depression and low libido. Belly fat can also be linked to stress which releases 

hormones like cortisol which signals the body to maintain its fat and weight and also to low DHEA (the precursor 

to these hormones).

Low testosterone which may be linked to stress, can also lead to belly fat in both men and women. This type of fat 

resists diet, is very difficult to remove and can increase estrogen levels. This jump in estrogen levels helps to 

develop platelet aggregation, coagulation and inflammation in arteries which may cause a heart attack. The 

The Journal of the American Medical Assoc. published a study measuring estradiol (the active form of estrogen) in 

men with chronic heart failure (CHF). The end results were: men with the lowest level were 217% more likely to 

die and men in the highest level were 133% more likely to die sooner from all sources than men with a balanced 

estradiol—testosterone level. 

Now you know what belly fat,obesity can do.

References: 

Harvard Medical School Publications

Testosterone for Life , Testosrerone for a Quality Life, The Truth about Men and Sex; Dr Abraham Morgentaler, 

Harvard Medical School

 N.E. Journal of Medicine

Journal of the American Medical Assoc.

Journal of the American Heart Assoc.

Center for Science in the Public Interest, Michael Miller MD, Prof., Un. of Maryland 

Stanford Medical School

RB&E (online)

Consumer Labs

Life Extension Foundation. Philip Lee Miller,MD

Un. Of Texas Health Science Center

Johns Hopkins University Medical School

Scientific American

Boston University Medical School

ARTICLES

J. Mercola MD

Willaim Davis MD

Ray Shealin MD

Mark Moyad MD

Ross B. Macdonald January ,2016 121 1019; 415 153 5378, 

extendinglives@gmail.com;www.extendinglivesmexico.com